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TOPIC: disinfecting eggs

disinfecting eggs 1 month 6 days ago #184

  • Guest - Alfonso
tewodvot wrote:
There are conflicting lines of thought on whether to wash and disinfect eggs before setting for hatching. There are those who do not wash any eggs before setting and simply brush off any dirty or soiled eggs prior to placing in the incubator. The argument is that the natural mucosal coating that dries on the egg after it is laid is sufficient to protect the egg from bacteria entering through the pores of the eggshell and that any washing removes this natural protectant thereby allowing bacteria to enter during the washing or afterwards. There are also those who wash every egg in warm water mixed with specified amounts of bleach, betadine, or some other disinfectant solution/detergent. The thought behind washing is that the washing removes harmful bacteria that may be on the shell of the egg occurring from passing through the hen or from any contamination the egg may have experienced after being laid.

It is worth noting that an ostrich egg laid in a muddy or water-filled nest tends to have a much lower probability of hatching--even if the egg is first washed with some type of disinfectant solution prior to setting. Some producers will simply forego setting eggs that are excessively dirty and/or laid in a muddy or water-filled nest for fear the egg may contaminate other eggs in the incubator during the incubation process. At any rate, there are many resources available online for someone to further research whether to wash or not wash eggs and you can make an informed decision that best suits your needs after reviewing the pros and cons of each side of the argument.

That being said, the best practice it to gather eggs as soon as possible after being laid to help prevent chances of contamination or soiling of the egg. Because ostriches dig shallow nests in the ground, some producers place a layer of sand in the nest to help prevent mud from building up in the nest and to allow the nest to dry faster after periods of rain.
Last Edit: 1 month 2 days ago by BigBirdGuy.

disinfecting eggs 1 year 2 months ago #74

  • Guest
I have been hatching over ten years. I don't ever disinfect the eggs. I'm one of those that just brushes them off with a clean rag and consider them ready to incubate. Mother nature has that one covered. I agree with the person that doesn't set eggs that are wet or taken from mud. I assume that in the wild the hen would probably remove it from the nest at some point in time because of lack of development.
Last Edit: 1 year 2 months ago by BigBirdGuy.

disinfecting eggs 1 year 2 months ago #72

  • tewodvot
There are conflicting lines of thought on whether to wash and disinfect eggs before setting for hatching. There are those who do not wash any eggs before setting and simply brush off any dirty or soiled eggs prior to placing in the incubator. The argument is that the natural mucosal coating that dries on the egg after it is laid is sufficient to protect the egg from bacteria entering through the pores of the eggshell and that any washing removes this natural protectant thereby allowing bacteria to enter during the washing or afterwards. There are also those who wash every egg in warm water mixed with specified amounts of bleach, betadine, or some other disinfectant solution/detergent. The thought behind washing is that the washing removes harmful bacteria that may be on the shell of the egg occurring from passing through the hen or from any contamination the egg may have experienced after being laid.

It is worth noting that an ostrich egg laid in a muddy or water-filled nest tends to have a much lower probability of hatching--even if the egg is first washed with some type of disinfectant solution prior to setting. Some producers will simply forego setting eggs that are excessively dirty and/or laid in a muddy or water-filled nest for fear the egg may contaminate other eggs in the incubator during the incubation process. At any rate, there are many resources available online for someone to further research whether to wash or not wash eggs and you can make an informed decision that best suits your needs after reviewing the pros and cons of each side of the argument.

That being said, the best practice it to gather eggs as soon as possible after being laid to help prevent chances of contamination or soiling of the egg. Because ostriches dig shallow nests in the ground, some producers place a layer of sand in the nest to help prevent mud from building up in the nest and to allow the nest to dry faster after periods of rain.

disinfecting eggs 1 year 3 months ago #69

  • Guest - andrew
Can anyone recommend a product and instructions on use for disinfecting ratite eggs? Have you used it and does it work well?
Last Edit: 1 year 3 months ago by BigBirdGuy.
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